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The True Cost of Getting a Loan Versus a Mortgage

When it comes to borrowing money, there are a lot of options available. Two of the most popular are loans and mortgages. But which one is cheaper in the long run? It depends on a number of factors, including interest rates, fees, and the length of time you need to borrow the money.

Here’s a quick overview of loans and mortgages to help you decide which one is right for you!

The true cost of loans

When you’re considering a loan, it’s important to factor in all the costs, including interest charges, origination fees, and closing costs. The interest rate is the amount you’ll pay each year to borrow the money, expressed as a percentage of the total loan amount. 

Origination fees are charged by the lender for processing the loan, and can range from 1% to 5% of the loan amount. Closing costs are paid at the time of closing and can include things like appraisal fees, title insurance, and loan origination fees.

The total cost of a loan can vary significantly depending on the interest rate, origination fees, and closing costs. For example, let’s say you’re considering a $10,000 loan with a four-year term. 

At an interest rate of 5%, your annual payments would be $254. If the lender charges a 3% origination fee, you would need to pay $300 upfront. And if you have $500 in closing costs, the total cost of the loan would be $1,054.

The true cost of mortgages

The true cost of a mortgage includes more than just the interest you’ll pay each year. In addition to interest, you’ll also have to pay mortgage insurance, property taxes, and closing costs.

Mortgage insurance is typically required if you put less than 20% down on your home. It protects the lender in case you default on the loan. Property taxes are paid annually and are based on the value of your home. And closing costs can include things like appraisal fees, title insurance, and loan origination fees.

Assuming all other factors are equal, a mortgage will usually be more expensive than a loan because it has a longer term. However, the monthly payments on a mortgage are often lower than the payments on a loan, which can make it easier to afford.

Which one is cheaper in the long run?

The answer to this question depends on a number of factors, including interest rates, fees, and the length of time you need to borrow the money. In general, loans tend to be cheaper than mortgages if you only need to borrow the money for a short period of time. But if you need to borrow the money for a longer period of time, a mortgage will usually be cheaper than a loan.

To compare the true cost of loans and mortgages, let’s look at an example. Suppose you’re considering a $10,000 loan with a four-year term and a 5% interest rate. The total cost of the loan would be $1,054. Now let’s say you’re considering a 30-year mortgage on a $100,000 home with a 4% interest rate. The total cost of the mortgage would be $133,700.

In this example, the mortgage is more expensive than the loan in the short run. But over the long term, the loan becomes more expensive than the mortgage. This is because you’re paying interest for a longer period of time with a loan than with a mortgage.

The bottom line is that it’s important to compare the true cost of loans and mortgages before you make a decision. Be sure to factor in all the costs, including interest, origination fees, closing costs, and insurance. And remember that the cheapest option in the short run might not be the cheapest option in the long run.

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